Rovena Adjective endings- it is a brilliant powerpoint ! If it weren’t for what’s called the German case system, we couldn’t know who or what is the subject doing something, or who/what is being acted upon, etc. What is the deal with German adjective endings?! I think, that’s pretty neat. Note the significance of adjective endings on number words. The adjective takes the endings of the definite article in a parallel declension. the declensions for the nominative & accusative are identical. . This kind of declension of German adjectives is called strong declension and can be shown with the following spreadsheet: —— In the genitive, both the determiner (viel-) and the adjective (groß–) have the strong -r declension. “Strong” vs. “weak” inflection As occurs in other Germanic languages, in German we use these two adjectives with the following meaning: Strong means a verb or ending … You might also know that every German noun has a gender attached to it (masculine, feminine, neuter, or plural; listed across the top of the chart). it’s dumb). And there are TWO types: Adjectives: describe some feature of the noun (e.g. The Endings of Declined Adjectives There are three declension systems in German, Type I, stark (strong), Type II, schwach (weak), and Type III, gemischt (mixed). There are 4 German cases for the different roles a noun might have: These cases are like ‘slots’ in a sentence that get filled in with nouns. Now, let’s look at an example set of declension pattern #4 with a rulebreaker determiner that requires that the following adjective also take the strong declension. © 2020 German with Laura  |  All Rights Reserved  |  Privacy, 1711 Kings Way Onawa, IA 51040 |  (603) 303-8842  |  hallo@germanwithlaura.com, you’ve maybe been given 3 separate charts just for adjectives and up to another 7 to cover the rest of the declensions, every German noun has a gender attached to it, over-categorized into more sub-groups than necessary, there are a few determiners that actually take a, in the dative case only, an extra ‘n’ must be added to any plural noun that doesn’t already have an ‘n’ there (i.e. I have good news … you’re likely doing it all wrong! endstream endobj startxref can be combined together into our clever, radical All-In-One chart that is much more user-friendly. Only the first sentence truly makes sense, right? Adjectives are descriptive words. anywhere else and you really need to be. -e, -e, -er, -er. Forget about them! Change the order like I did in those examples and the meaning of the sentence changes, too. You can see that with these examples of ‘these big … dogs/cats/pigs’: nominative: diese großen … Hunde / Katzen / Schweineaccusative: diese großen … Hunde / Katzen / Schweinedative: diesen großen … Hunden / Katzen / Schweinengenitive: dieser großen … Hunde / Katzen / Schweine. German adjective endings. Adjective endings are historically the #1 most awful part of learning German. Declension patterns #2 and #4 have limited usage (see graphic above). The imperative has four forms: du, ihr, Sie and wir. The table provides an overview of adjective endings for the declension\inflection of German attributive adjectives. Being aware of these declension patterns is the 1st step in learning adjective endings smarter, not harder. "Strong" endings are used in contexts in which the adjective itself needs to provide case information because there is no article proceeding the adjective or the article does not provide that info (i.e. Using the case system is all about putting those endings on adjectives (and determiners) so we know which noun is doing what. After a definite article, use the weak ending. . Check out these scrambled English sentences: The kind man gives the sad dog a big bone.The sad dog gives the kind man a big bone.A big bone gives the kind man the sad dog. last. This is honest-to-goodness-scout’s-honor the ONLY declensions chart you need. the plural genitive is identical to the feminine genitive. That’s how this all ties together. Whether you use a strong ending or a weak ending depends on which article (der, ein) is used. Take adjective endings, for example. Languages / German / Grammar / Adjectives and adverbs; 16+ View more. Again, this is the end result for the nominative: diesEr große Hund. This slight distinctive edge makes the "der"-word endings favored in German: they are the "strong" endings. First, let’s work with the same example as the masculine (‘this big dog’), but replace ‘dog’ with ‘cat’ (<– die Katze, feminine noun): nominative: diese große Katzeaccusative: diese große Katzedative: dieser großen Katzegenitive: dieser großen Katze. Examples of the endings: pink? Singular, plural. I don’t know that it’s going to make me a millionaire, but I am dang proud of this chart I created while getting my master’s in German. Since we’re working with the same determiner & adjective set-up, we’ll still be using declension pattern #1, which dictates that the determiner takes the strong declension and the adjective takes the weak declension. German adjectives that come after the noun are not declined/inflected and often separated from the noun by a form of sein (to be) like: ist (is) if the noun is in a singular form or sind (are) if … 100? (The four cases, the nominative, accusative, dative, and genitive, are discussed elsewhere). The strong inflection is used when there is no article at all, or if the noun is preceded by a non-inflectable word or phrase such as ein bisschen, etwas or viel ("a little, some, a lot of/much"). The forms are the same as the ihr, Sie and wir forms of the present tense for most strong, weak and mixed verbs, but the du form drops the -st present tense ending and sometimes adds an -e on the end. Other resources by this author. It’s those adjective endings (declensions) that signal the case of the following noun. For starters, we’re going to stick with the same ‘this big …’ from above and use the neuter noun Schwein (pig). Otherwise sentences don’t have any meaning (or wouldn’t have clear, unambiguous meaning, anyway). No such thing as adjective endings (<– better word: declensions) exists in English. %PDF-1.6 %���� Most learners of German are pretty terrified when their teachers whip out chart after chart of German declensions bubbling over with all sorts of confusing terminology. endstream endobj 143 0 obj <>stream Enough to pass a test. the dative & genitive declensions are the same you saw above with the masculine! And what about those three no declension spots?) For example, in English: 'The lovely house'. You probably assume you need to know the case of the noun (nominative, accusative, dative, or genitive; listed down the right side of the chart). About the series producer: https://doktorfrag.wordpress.com Need these slides for your class? Let’s actually keep working with the same noun phrase from above: this big dog. Once you notice the parallel and the agreement of the letters n, e, s with den, die, das, it makes the process a little clearer. Read on! endstream endobj 140 0 obj <>/Metadata 4 0 R/OCProperties<><><>]/OFF[158 0 R]/Order[]/RBGroups[]>>/OCGs[158 0 R]>>/PageLayout/OneColumn/Pages 137 0 R/StructTreeRoot 11 0 R/Type/Catalog>> endobj 141 0 obj <>/ExtGState<>/Font<>/ProcSet[/PDF/Text]/XObject<>>>/Rotate 0/StructParents 0/Type/Page>> endobj 142 0 obj <>stream Graphic above ) we put on the groß– because the necessary declension itself is ‘. Such flexibility in sentence structure is all about putting those endings on adjectives ( and )... Speaking German well … but it can feel so random, nonsensical, and genitive are. The German word for 'car ' is the end result for the nominative &?! Since it ’ s because, in English, we still need to know … ( and other words tell! Makes no difference what gender the noun has neither a definite nor indefinite article or ein-word in nominative... The way that adjective endings on number words or eine then the is! 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